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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, drones can be more useful in that kind of environment. our allies seem to want to take the lead. but we're going to have to be much more supportive than we're now willing to be in that area. and we're going to have to think hard about other places like syria. >> right. >> where there's, you know, a massive loss of life, 60,000 already. and we're hanging back there. again, i think out of reluctance to get too involved because of the slippery slope that in the end will have to be militarily involved and the people and the president have better things to do. >> a piece in "the wall street journal" this week saying basically there's too much reaction to iraq and inaction here he compares to the first president bush not doing anything about the shiite uprising in iraq in 1991, which he argued led ultimately to the second gulf war. i think that may be an area where people would debate, but what are the consequences of the u.s. hanging back in syria? >> well, if we hang back in syria, there could be a dissent into chaos. it's already headed in that direction. again, the rise of these islamic j
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
faced by all american officials operating overseas, how to remain active in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of s
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
there are very few countries in the world that let you do what you do and be -- and live in this environment and have your personal possessions be secured through the court systems, through the police, through all the many things that this country offers, so i have never had a problem with that before. >> never had a problem before. but then he was asked but you have a problem now? and he went on to say well, i'm not sure what my fair share is now. but we can tell you that phil mickelson's tax bill stands to go up all tolled about 6 million bucks this year, shep. >> shepard: might he still leave california or is that up in the air or what? >> well, he says he still hasn't decided but the door leaving california is very much wide open surprising as we said phil mickelson is a san diego guy. he was raised there. his wife's family lives there. his family lives there. very involved in the community. then he was asked if he has spoken to others in his financial situation and here is what he he said. >> we have talked and will continue to talk to the best tax advisors, what have you. i love this s
ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had gotten used to, economic growth of the past that countries and companies had hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. the imf released a new report this week with growth numbers that are low. lower th
combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> reporter: others claim women suffer more combat casualties than illnesses and pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain, it's equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women are obviously -- are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize, though, there should be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military. >> reporter: many say it's a question of equal rights and serving in combat allows a soldier to advance through the ranks, farther and faster. >> the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight, including physical strength, plus courage, plus aptitude, plus leadership and all the things we need for the most effective fighting force. >> reporter: military service chiefs have until may 15 to make their case about which jobs if any should still exclude women. >> jamie: steve c
environment. 28% saw a decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year, when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery, followed by slowdowns of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa, have made people wary of excessive optimism. these are stable, crises have been contained. there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we have turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos this year, no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, they just had that their first year with $50 billion in revenue. it's a sense of growth that people have gotten used to, growth that companies have hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. growth numbers that are low, lower than they had projected only a few months ago. the world is coming to grips with the fact that the financial crisis might have ushered in not a few years, but a decades of slow growth. and we're not
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot about the campaign -- during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the president's message was the economy. >> the last question beca
consider the historically low interest rate environment and the fed saying they will continue to pump money into the economy to stimulate it, you will see the stock market continued to rally. this stock market knows that the government will continue to try to prop things up and that will continue to push these stock prices higher. dennis: how much longer can you continue to punish the sector this is the only direct interchange that the administration had on a regular basis or eight euros regular basis with the business community they really think that they can guide this economy much better than the private sector can. i think that is dangerous. private obama kind of got diverted away from the economy and onto obamacare. at the inauguration, he talked about global warming and green technology. he talked about gun control. i did not hear him talk much about jobs. charles: at this point, it is a second term. he does not have to put up the faÇade anymore. almost everybody on there was a liberal. to your point, the president will now work on his legacy. his legacy has never had anything to do
of people raising it and how they are raising it given the environment we are in in the aftermath of a terrible tragedy. no gun laws have ever worked to accomplish that. some of the place necessary this country with the strictist gun laws have the most violence. let's have that debate, we are happy to point out that. bill: last week harry reid seemed to suggest that he did not want to put his senate democrats in an uncomfortable situation regarding a vote on gun control. there are 20 democratic senators up for re-election in 2014. is it your belief that he's trying to give them cover? >> well, i understand why, we -- by the way, the right to bear arms is not something we made up. it is a constitutional right and i hope that there are democrats that are uncomfortable about doing things that undermine that. it is a basic fundamental american rights, it's one of the unique rights we have compared to the rest of the world and it's one we won't give up easily i tell that you much. bill: thank you for your time. marco rubio the republican from florida. one of the reasons he was on with
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)